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International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry
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Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 36 (2016), No. 3     15. Apr. 2016
Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 36 (2016), No. 3  (15.04.2016)

Page 431-436, doi:10.11607/prd.2209, PubMed:27100814


Dimensional Changes in Alveolar Ridge Following Extraction of Teeth in the Maxillary Premolar Area in Subjects with Thick and Thin Gingival Biotypes: A Pilot Study
Abdelhafez, Reem S. / Alhabashneh, Rola / Khader, Yousef / Hijazi, Mohammed / Jarah, Mohammed
This study investigated changes in residual ridge dimensions after tooth extraction among thin and thick gingival biotypes. Fifteen patients who required extraction of maxillary premolars were classified according to gingival biotypes (10 teeth in 9 participants were included in the thick group, and 6 teeth in 6 participants were included in the thin group). Minimally traumatic extractions were carried out using periotomes and rotational movement of teeth. At the time of extraction an osteometer was used to measure the thickness of the labial plate and the bony alveolar ridge at the extraction site by penetrating the tissues until bone was reached 5 mm, 7 mm, and 10 mm below the midpoint of the crest of the facial and palatal gingival margins. Standardized radiographs were taken immediately and after 3 months. The results of this study show minimal differences in dimensional changes following extraction of premolar teeth in thick and thin gingival biotypes. Significantly greater bone loss was detected in both gingival biotypes when the labial plate thickness was less than 1.5 mm, especially in alveolar ridge height.